Mountain enthusiast takes life one step at a time

Jaxon Porterfield

"Whether you live in a van down by the river, or if it's multi-million dollar home in the Power Horn, as long as you wake up in the morning and you're happy, I think you've achieved success."

"Whether you live in a van down by the river, or if it's multi-million dollar home in the Power Horn, as long as you wake up in the morning and you're happy, I think you've achieved success."
Jaxon Porterfield
“Whether you live in a van down by the river, or if it’s multi-million dollar home in the Power Horn, as long as you wake up in the morning and you’re happy, I think you’ve achieved success.”

Avid outdoorsmen, academician, and patriot, Loren Migrants enters her senior year with a head full of philosophy and intent. Migrants can be found in the mountains, fishing or hiking and soaking up the cool air, while searching for someone to teach her the art of fly fishing. Migrants and I sat down over pancakes and hash browns to discuss her journey through high school and life.

Migrants was a participant in the We The People team last year and also a member of Unit 4–who received the Best Unit award at Nationals in Washington, D.C. last April 22-27. Migrants said that the We The People team really helped shape her as a person, because it “gave me a deeper understanding of American government, which I think is really important as a citizen; especially a millennial since the stress isn’t there any more.”  Migrants continued, “It has shaped the way I look at things, instead of just looking at what I think is morally correct, I look at what is constitutionally correct.”

Migrants is also a varsity member of the Speech and Debate team, this being her fourth year as a Public Forum Debater and Poet. Migrants explained that Speech and Debate really helped her learn the importance of looking at an idea from both sides, not just from what may be morally or politically correct, or what facts and evidence shows as correct. She was also part of Student Council for three years, and Model United Nations for two. All of these activities have allowed her to grow as a more dynamic person.

When asked about her future plans, Migrants began to look apprehensive. With a sly smile on her face she confessed, “I have come to a point where I tell people I’m a sophomore in high school just so they won’t ask me what my plans are after high school. I have no idea.” Since the sixth grade, Migrants has dreamed of enlisting in the army, following the same military path as her dad and grandpa before her. Although, she’s begun second-guessing herself, stating that “I also feel like there are all these people at the high school and in my life that have given me incredible opportunities to make something more of myself. I feel almost like I owe it to them to go to college and try to do something more productive,” since college would have to wait an additional six years.

Success is defined by Webster’s dictionary as “the accomplishment of an aim or purpose,” but Migrants approaches this idea from a more abstract viewpoint. Migrants explained how “American society today defines success as six digits in their bank account, where they have a steady job, where they wear a suit. They have a house, a spouse, a couple of kids. A nice car.” But to her, success is when she wakes up and goes to work or school in the morning and she’s happy. “Whether you live in a van down by the river, or if it’s multi million dollar home in the Powder Horn, as long as you wake up in the morning and you’re happy, I think you’ve achieved success.”

Migrants has had some influential teachers here at Sheridan High School who have helped her achieve success. “It’s a tie between T-Money Emborg and Mike Clift,” she said happily. Migrants described Emborg as the parent who never says “I love you,” yet “he does things that lets you know that deep down inside you’re doing a good job. His teaching style, it made me push a lot harder for his approval.” While her other mentor took the subject that was her “least favorite, which is English, and he makes it fun. He has taught me a lot about how to further myself as an artist as far as literature goes.” Emborg taught Migrants Advanced Placement Government in her junior year and Mike Clift currently instructs her in Advanced Placement British Literature.

Sitting in Perkins during this interview, the waitress placed a plate of hot hashbrowns in front of Migrants, and politely asked if she’d like some ketchup. Migrants looked up and smiled, “I think ketchup is a cardinal sin.”

Loren Migrants is the daughter of Rick Migrants and Sarah Tucker.